A Revision of Soybean Caterpillar Pest Information for U.S. Soybean

Lepidopteran pests of soybean—such as the inexperienced cloverworm (Hypena scabra), proven here—are rising in significance in the U.S., and a pair of articles in the Journal of Built-in Pest Administration provides up to date steering on biology, distribution, and administration choices for 5 top caterpillar pests of soybean. (Image by Adam Varenhorst)

By Erin Hodgson, Ph.D., and Anders Huseth, Ph.D.

Anders Huseth, Ph.D.

Anders Huseth, Ph.D.

Erin Hodgson, Ph.D.

Erin Hodgson, Ph.D.

There hardly ever appears to be a uninteresting summer season when you are an extension entomologist of field crops. Like Coolio reported, there is often “sumpin’ new” going on in agriculture. Fluctuating pest populations and invasive species make our jobs exciting. Include in new chemistries and technologies updates, and it’s difficult to continue to keep up with almost everything.

When a pest does set up and grow to be a trouble, we want to supply accurate identification and timely management tips. Sad to say, lots of of our experimented with-and-real means are getting out of day. New extension people have been particularly disappointed by a deficiency of latest sources. In individual, there is not enough recent information on caterpillars feeding in soybean, although these pests are starting to be far more economically crucial in the U.S. and all-around the globe. So, a handful of of us determined to build an update for some of the most notable species in U.S. soybean. We characterize five states unfold throughout the country: Florida, Iowa, Louisiana, Minnesota, and North Carolina.

To begin, we surveyed discipline crop entomologists in all soybean-increasing states to greater fully grasp recent pest incidence and abundance in soybean (about 83 million acres). We compiled knowledge from all 31 soybean-producing states all through the winter season of 2020. Information indicated five species that continually bubbled to the top of the record: eco-friendly cloverworm (Hypena scabra), soybean looper (Chrysodeixis includens), corn earworm (Helicoverpa zea), velvetbean caterpillar (Anticarsia gemmatalis), and painted girl (Vanessa cardui, also recognised as thistle caterpillar in its larval variety).

Following summarizing study information and facts, we determined to generate profiles on these species to boost identification, distribution, and scouting pointers. Our group applied older research and new industry observations to develop profiles of these critical pests. Last, we needed to aim on management, specifically highlighting insecticide resistance challenges beginning to turn into distinguished in some states. The effects of this operate are shared in two content released earlier this 12 months in the Journal of Built-in Pest Management—one on identification and biology and one more on distribution and populace persistence—with a third article continue to in the functions.

Success from our study provide a up to date evaluation of distribution and persistence of lepidopterans in soybean. Like the aforementioned rap artist says, discipline crop extension entomology is a “fantastic voyage,” and we hope the articles or blog posts assist give up-to-date information and facts for caterpillar identification and management.

Erin Hodgson, Ph.D., is a professor and extension entomologist at Iowa Point out University. E mail: [email protected]. Anders Huseth, Ph.D., is an assistant professor and extension professional at North Carolina State College. Email: [email protected].